A Few Useful Hints for

BETTER OPERATION

And your Rolling Stock

 

Page 1

 

arrow_2_blueLeft

PROJECTS

arrow_2_blueLRightgif

arrow_2_blueLeft

MISC PROJ

arrow_2_blueLRightgif

arrow_2_blueLeft

OPERATION

arrow_2_blueLRightgif

NMRALogo_B

NERLogo_16

 

HOME

TO TRAINS

PASSES

LINKS

OTHER

PROJECTS

  ABOUT ME

SITE MAP

 

 

 

Under Construction 

 

 

THIS SECTION IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION SO PLEASE RETURN LATER. 

 

MEANWHILE, CLICK  HERE  FOR A VALID PAGE

OR SEE CLINIC UNDER SAME NAME 

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

Let’s face it, derailments can be a pain. 

If several cars derail over the same section of track

      Then the problem is probably the Trackwork

But if a single car consistently derails at one or more locations

       The probably is with the car or piece of rolling stock

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

   

The first thing to check for is the build up of dirt and crud on the wheel tread. 

This is true if cleaning fluids of any type have been used on the track

        And is especially true where track cleaning cars are used

Use an “orange” stick or some pointed piece of wood and a solvent to remove the build up

And alternate method is to “wet” a section of track (I use soap and kerosene)

      And run the car back and forth across it. 

This may take a while if the dirt is heavy

 

Do NOT use steel wool, scotch bright or any similar material

      As they can leave particles that work their way into the axle bearings

            And cause damage.  Even a felt pad with a Dermal tool can cause problems.

Any sharp metal tool can scratch and damage the wheels, especially if they are plastic or nylon

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

Weight each car as required

 

       How much should car weigh?

             To little and the car is more likely to derail

              To much and needless drag will me few cars behind the engine

       NMRA recommended practice is oz plus ½ ounce for every inch of car length   

       That is the TOTAL weight of a car

           What has to be determined is how much extra weight do we need to add?

 

       How much do the required trucks, couplers etc weigh

             Include and metal fittings such as end sills

       Also, take a guess at weight of wood, paint and any other items

 

       Subtract the above to determine weights required

 

       Determine what to use

             Lead is relatively cheap, heavy and commonly found

                   Not strong

             Cerro bend (Woods metal) low melt point alloys expensive but easily molded

             Copper pennies most cost effective but requires more room

             Tungsten is heaviest in raw form

                      but most expensive and little better than lead when used with binders

             brass is cheap and easy to get

                     not as heavy as lead

                     strong and relatively easy to shape

                     most suitable for this project

           select brass with thickness approximating car floor

                    width must be narrow enough to fit between sides of car

                    length between truck bolsters

            

 

 

 

 

   

   Topics

       Bolsters

           Bearing surface for trucks

           Critical measurements

                   Floor to pedestal

                   Wheel flange to car side

                    Real world vs. model

       Trucks

           Use RP-25 brass wheels

                  Check with track gauge

                   Check for proper operation if wheels replaced

                         Make sure wheels do not contact side frame

                         Insulation on same side to prevent short circuit

 

           Select wide bearing surface

           Remove burrs

               Screw hole and adjacent surface

           Critical measurements

               Rail to pedestal may differ between types of trucks used

            Remove screw slop

                   #2 x 3/8 screw optimal

                   Use #2 washer in countersunk hole of truck

                        File OD so washer just fits hole

                         File ID so washer pivots on screw

                    Tighten screw

                           Check under each wheel to insure enough play

           Polish wheels for “running” look

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

    

   

      Assembling couplers

          Remove burrs

          Use graphite

           Thread springs and glue in place at one end

           Check for height using gauge

                 Understand that type of draft gear used

                        Will affect coupler height

                         i.e. using MKD#4 in metal pocket vs. plastic universal pocket is different

               Shim trucks with washers

               Remove stock from top of bolster

               Add ship under coupler

   

  

   

 

      

      

   

Truck screw and washer

steel car weight

 

   

 

   

   APPENDEX

 

    NMRA recommended practice for car weight:  1oz + 1/2oz for every inch of car length

 

    Couplers   (Kadee standards)

        height rail head to center of coupler knuckle:  25/64” or approx .390”

        top of rail to top of uncoupling ramp:  1/64 or approx .015”

        top of rail to bottom of trip pin:           1/32” or approx .032

 

     Trucks (general)

         HO trucks mount with a #2 x ½” wood screw

         Use #2 washer but it will usually have to be “trimmed down” a bit             

         Floor of car to pedestal of truck is about 9/64 or about .140”

     

 

 

 

METALS ON LINE       http://www.onlinemetals.com/index.cfm - The Web's superstore for small quantity metal orders Aluminum, brass, coppers and others in several shapes cut to length. no order is too small for our high standards.

   

 

 

 

   

 Sample weights

Grams

   Ounces

Trucks, freight

20

.7

Trucks, Passenger

40

1.4

MKD-4 Coupler w/draft gear

2

.05

Brass stock   1 x 1.25 x .125

23

.82

Typical Steel car weight

 

 

Pennies

2.5

.09

 

 

 

   

 

HOME

LAYOUTS 

PASSES

LINKS

ABOUT ME

SITE MAP

 

      

 

PROJECTS

NMRA

NER

HAYLOFT STEPPERS

 

 

 

SAILBOAT TZU HANG

WAR WAGON TRAIN

 

   

 

Model Railroading is fun in Connecticut.
Bob Van Cleef, MMR

Last update   08/02/2012