The factory at Boxton is a kitbash starting with (4) Revell Bakery kits.  Many of the structures in the background are kitbashed Design Preservation kits.  These are cut in two so that they serve as two separate structures.

scenery construction details on other pages

Scenes from the North River

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Local switcher engine 15 being serviced in outside stall of roundhouse a Bobston.  

This is the way engines were service at the turn of the century in hot, arid climates.  You can model this too simply by not adding the outside walls of a stall.

This 0-6-0 tenshodo switcher is still running after almost 40 years of service.

Local switcher engine 15 being serviced in outside stall of roundhouse a Bobston.†

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This sand facility, like several other structures on the North River, is similar to commercial kits on the market but is completely scratch built from plans in the Model Railroader.  

Note the ashpit in the foreground.  This is one of several places to spot a car much the annoyance of the yard crews.

Castings on the wooden WW-II hopper were duplicated from the Ambroid kits and the car slightly re-dimensioned from drawings in a car builder's cyclopedia

This sand facility, like several other structures on the North River, is similar to commercial kits on the market but is completely scratch built from plans in the Model Railroader.

 

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Stock pens at Bossertís Beef and Bologna siding.  The prototype in Jacksonville, Ill was pretty run down years ago and I suppose today it is long gone.

The extensive fencing was built using a jig to space the slates and posts.  Another was used for the chutes and yet another to build the frames of the cattle sheds.

A genuine sample was used to give the proper aroma for the contest which the judges refused to admit may have earned an extra point or two.

Stock pens at Bossertís Beef and Bologna siding.† The prototype in Jacksonville, Ill. was pretty run down years ago and I suppose that today it is long gone.

 

 

 

Far overview of Bossert Beef and Bologna showing more of the pens and general layout of the company.

The extensive fencing was built using a jig to space the slats and posts.  Another was used for the chutes and yet another to build the frames of the cattle sheds.

A genuine sample was used to give the proper aroma for the contest, which the judges refused to admit, may have earned an extra point or two.

Far overview of Bossert Beef and Bologna showing more of the pens and general layout of the company.

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Local Switcher at Bettinger shuffles the local traffic.

This is another example of recycled engines.  It has been retro fit for DC/DCC operation and repowered .  Those saddle tanks are loaded with lead allowing this engine to pull a lot more than one would think.

This powerful little local switcher at Bettinger easily shuffles the local traffic between Bettinger and Union.

 

 

 

 

Peddler freight starts its run from Bobston.  Believe it or not those wooden hoppers are too modern for this era.  They were built during WW-II to save on scarce metal supplies needed for the war effort.  You have to admit they do look pretty much in place.

Peddler freight starts its run from Bobston.† Believe it or not those wooden hoppers are too modern for this era.† They were built during WW-II to save on scarce metal supplies needed for the war effort.

 

 

Droverís caboose.  I believe the actual Alexander kit dates back to about 1942 with the addition of more modern Central Valley passenger trucks. The hardest part of this project was to re-shape and flatten the fragile white-metal castings without breaking them.

Droverís caboose.† I believe the actual kit dates back to about 1942 with the addition of more modern Central Valley passenger trucks.

 

A rare excursion run leaves Harrietta for a picnic at Bobston.
This particular passenger coach is a Selley and is made from white metal while its sister coaches are mostly plastic Roundhouse Kits

Trackwork is hand-laid code 70 with scratch-built switches.
The switch-stand in front of the coach is a concession to operation. It controls the electrical switch machines under the table. The originally powered Tenshodo twin-coil solenoids have been replaced by stall motors

A rare excursion run leaves Harrietta for a picnic at Bobston.

 

 

 

This Woodland Scenic Ice house supplies ice to Bobston.  

This is another example of using the first nine inches or so of the table for scenic purposes.

This Woodland Scenic Ice house supplies ice to Bobston.†

 

 

 

 

This is another view of North Riverís deluxe daily passenger service

Several jigs and fixtures were used to build this freelance wooden doodlebug.  Yes, the power trucks have a third rail shoe, but I can show you pictures of cars very similar to this with third rail operation even if the cars were steel, not wooden.  Let's just say the North River was a little bit ahead of times with this and leave it at that.

 

This is another view of North Riverís deluxe daily passenger service

 

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Model Railroading is fun in Connecticut.
Bob Van Cleef, MMR

Last update†† 07/24/2012