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Taking pictures can be a lot of fun and you do not have to have a digital camera to take quality pictures.   Truth be known the best digital camera can not capture anything near the amount of detail as the least expensive film camera.   Surprisingly great pictures can be taken with a simple home-made pin-hole camera using a wooden box with a wad of putty for the shutter.   To get a digital image from a conventional film camera you can either scan the image or have the film digitized to a CD and you will see a few pictures on this site done this old-fashioned way.   The problem with film of course is it takes time to be developed and it can be expensive to take enough shots to get one that looks good.

Either a Camcorder or a rail-cam can yield some very interesting pictures that can be extracted through any number of frame captures or movie editing programs that work either through a television and/or through some kind of hardware but they generally have very poor resolution.   Still, you will see a few such shots here also and they did inspire this and the following pages.

The nice thing about digital cameras is that you can see what you are taking a picture of both in the viewer and in the back LED screen and the image is instantly "developed."  The disadvantage of going digital is a comparatively longer focus time but the use of the camera's timer and a tripod make this a moot issue. 

Disclaimer:  I am not above using a photo touch-up programs to improve results.

 

 

 

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This site was started shortly after I received this free camera with my new Dell system.

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The Sony DSC-8 is a newer 3.2 mega pixel camera with a bit more versatility in zoom and exposure settings.

 

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This is the RailCam camera assembly. It contains the lens, a color imaging sensor and the support circuitry required for a remote TV camera.

 

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The Railcam camera is mounted in a heavily weighted car that contains the camera proper, batteries, and a transmitter that sends a signal to a nearby TV receiver.

 

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This Tooled leather carrier is used to store extra memory cards and batteries for the FinePix camera.

 

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  The case holds two spare batteries and four flash cards which is enough for about 150 to 200 images.

 

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These three carriers hold the media for the Sony camera. 

 

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Depending on the memory card size and battery charge this is enough for up to five hours of continuous picture taking and between 300 to 450 images.  

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Most digital cameras actually take two exposures, one to capture a gray-scale reading for light exposure and another for the image itself. This type of unit contains a photocell and circuitry to detect and fire on either the first or second light strobe making it useful for both conventional and digital cameras. No wires are needed to connect it to the camera and it is handy for filling in shadows or dark areas of the subject.

  

      

       

   

 

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Bob Van Cleef, MMR

Last update   7/26/2012